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The Kreuzberg Initiative against Anti-Semitism – KIgA

Political Education for the German multicultural society

Founded in 2003/04, the Kreuzberg Initiative against Anti-Semitism (KIgA), a registered non-profit organisation, was one of the first German civil society initiatives to develop education-based methods for dealing with anti-Semitism in a multicultural German society. We develop models for curricular and extra-curricular education tailored to the everyday reality of the young people we work with.

Engaged and innovative

We work with complex and sensitive, potentially explosive topics. Our focuses are anti-Semitism, past and present; the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; and political Islamism. Through education, we provide sensible and practical ways of confronting these issues.

Education is to us more than just the transmission of knowledge; it is a complex and multifaceted process. In looking at familiar topics from unfamiliar angles, we aim to encourage engagement with the act of learning, and critical self-reflection.

Our work is designed to target contemporary German society, formed as it is, by immigration. In particular, we work with youths and young adults brought up in Muslim communities.

Wide-ranging and effective

Our team is composed of people from a wide range of different backgrounds and as such we are able to draw on many years of interdisciplinary experience. We train educators, plan and organise academic discussions, and offer consultation services for politicians, political organisations, local municipalities and in the education sector. .

Consistently excellent

We have received significant recognition for our work against discrimination and anti-Semitism. In 2006 we were nominated “Active for democracy and tolerance” by the Association for Democracy and Tolerance, a success followed in 2008 by winning the “alex – Together against right-wing extremism” prize. Most recently, in 2012 the Central Council of Jews in Germany awarded us the “Paul Spiegel Prize for Civic Courage”.